Current Exhibitions

Waterloo Bridge

Monet’s Waterloo Bridge: Vision and Process

October 7, 2018–January 6, 2019

This small but powerful focus exhibition of Claude Monet’s “Waterloo Bridge” series includes the stellar example from MAG’s collection along with seven others borrowed from North American sister institutions. Monet saw the paintings both individually and as an ensemble that, collectively, expressed his sense of the essential subject—the atmosphere and colors of the fog-bound landscape of the Thames. The concurrent experience of viewing several of the series will create a special dialogue between the visitor and the works of art.

An exciting aspect of this exhibition is the opportunity to work closely with conservation lab at Buffalo State University. Newly-developed photographic technologies that allow close examination of the surface of the picture will make it possible to decipher more about how Monet altered his canvases from their initial rendering in London to his obsessive reworking of the canvases upon his return to France.
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shown: Claude Monet, Waterloo Bridge, Veiled Sun (detail) 1903


Roy Lichtenstein detail

Seeing in Color and Black-and-White

October 7, 2018–January 6, 2019
Developed as a companion to Monet’s Waterloo Bridge: Vision and Process, this exhibition features artists such as Josef Albers, Victor Vasarely, and Jesús Rafael Soto, who chose abstraction over representation to reveal the mechanics of human vision and make viewers aware of how they see.
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shown: Roy Lichtenstein, Cathedral #2 (detail) 1969


Passover Matzos

Fabric of Survival: The Art of Esther Nisenthal Krinitz

August 17–December 2, 2018
Esther Nisenthal Krinitz was 12 in 1939 when the Nazis came to her Polish village. She remembers every detail through a series of exquisitely embroidered fabric collages. Her art is an eyewitness account of tragedy and healing. Listen in to the Rochester Jewish Film Festival interview on Connections with WXXI’s Evan Dawson.
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Shown: Passover Matzos, (detail) Embroidery and fabric collage, 1998.



The Way Things Go - cropped

Peter Fischli & David Weiss: The Way Things Go

October 26, 2018–March 17, 2019
From 1979 to 2012, the Swiss duo of Peter Fischli (b. 1952) and David Weiss (1946–2012) created a distinctly humorous body of multimedia work that employed humble materials and referenced ordinary subjects. Their film The Way Things Go (Der Lauf der Dinge), 1987, features a seemingly endless chain reaction of everyday objects with the expected human intervention needed to incite their movement curiously absent. learn more

shown: Peter Fischli (Swiss, b. 1952) and David Weiss (Swiss, 1946–2012)
The Way Things Go, 1987 (still, detail) Image provided courtesy of Icarus Films.
Gift of Nancy S. and Peter O. Brown


Work in Progress with Sarah C Rutherford

Sarah C. Rutherford

Through December 2018
New work by Sarah C. Rutherford, Her Voice Carries | Prelude is now on view in the Hurlbut Gallery. This work is part of her #HerVoiceCarries series, an art project on view throughout Rochester, featuring Rochester women who are changing their individual and collective worlds.
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Lucy Burne Gallery in the Creative Workshop

The Enigmatic Imagination of John Kastner
[October 1- 31]


Jim Sanborn

Argentum: Double-Positive

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Argentum: Double-Positive, a new light sculpture by Jim Sanborn, is tested for the first time at University of Rochester’s Memorial Art Gallery June 22, 2017. // photo by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester.


Centennial Sculpture Park

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shown: detail, Albert Paley, Soliloquy (2013). Gift of the Cameros Family and Ann Mowris Mulligan, with additional support from Bank of America Charitable Foundation, FULL MEA5URE, the Herdle-Moore Fund, the Rubens Family Foundation, and the Clara and Edwin Strasenburgh Fund.
photo: Brandon Vick.

Albert Paley Soliloquy