Animating this Fable

The artist Frans Snyders used the plants, animals, and landscape around his home in Belgium to illustrate this popular fable, creating a group of highly believable creatures in a familiar setting.

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The spiral tendrils of a grapevine wrap around the tree, allowing a ripening bunch of grapes to hang from the branches.
The entire scene takes place out of doors under the branches of a leafy tree.
The European Grey Heron substitutes for the crane or stork in Aesop's fable, because the artist preferred to use familiar creatures that lived near his home.
A second fox and heron appear to be focused on a shallow bowl or plate lying between them. Across the river, the thin spire of a church steeple topped by a cross pokes above the treetops.
The landscape stretches out beyond a grove of trees to show a river and distant hills.
A red fox with a long bushy tail watches hungrily as the heron eats from the jar. Foxes eat a widely diverse diet, and are known for a playful, clever sense of humor.
The large, narrow-necked glass jar contains water with live frogs and fish, as well as a long snake-like fish called an eel being slurped up by the heron.
The meaning of the numbers 166, or perhaps I66, at the bottom corners of the painting, remains a mystery.
Several frogs gather at the edge of the water to watch the action.
A green-headed male mallard duck watches the action from the edge of the stream or small pond.
The meaning of the numbers 166, or perhaps I66, at the bottom corners of the painting, remains a mystery.